Skip to main content

Welcome to the website of the Australian Industrial Chemicals Introduction Scheme (AICIS). We started on 1 July 2020. Read about us.

Multi-component introductions

This type of introduction is for the import or manufacture of an unseparated mixture of 2 or more similar chemicals. You only need to pay once for a multi-component introduction regardless of how many components there are. 

You should consider the hazard profile and introduction volumes of all of the components when you’re working out if the certificate assessment will be health focused, environment focused or both.

In situations where some components only have a medium to high indicative environment risk and others only have a medium to high indicative human health risk, categorisation should consider both and have a combined health and environment focus.  

Note: Multi-component introductions are not chemicals of unknown or variable composition, complex reaction products or biological materials (UVCB). The difference is that you can identify the components in a multi-component introduction and they’re in fixed proportions. If you're introducing a UVCB, contact us.

What types of chemicals does the application cover?

The chemical mixture needs to meet the following criteria:

  • all components are manufactured together
  • all components are identifiable
  • the components aren’t separated during introduction and use in Australia
  • the components are in fixed proportions

All components are manufactured together

The components can’t be manufactured: 

  • separately then mixed together
  • by 2 or more chemicals that aren’t chemically linked reacting with other chemicals to form 2 or more products with no cross-reactions occurring between the products (parallel reactions)

The components aren’t separated during introduction and use in Australia

The components must be introduced and used together, but they can be isolated for analysis and testing.

Examples

Example of a parallel reaction

A combination of 1-propanol (CAS number 71-23-8) and 1-butanol (CAS number 71-36-3) are reacted with acetic acid, 1,1'-anhydride (CAS number 108-24-7). This would form 2 products, acetic acid, propyl ester (CAS number 109-60-4) and acetic acid, butyl ester (CAS number 123-86-4). 

There’s no cross-reactions of acetic acid, propyl ester and acetic acid, butyl ester. This mixture doesn’t meet the multi-component introduction criteria.

Reaction scheme of 1-propanol (1) and 1-butanol (2) with acetic acid, 1,1'-anhydride (3) to produce acetic acid, propyl ester (4) and acetic acid, butyl ester (5).

Reaction scheme of 1-propanol (1) and 1-butanol (2) with acetic acid, 1,1'-anhydride (3) to produce acetic acid, propyl ester (4) and acetic acid, butyl ester (5). 

Example of the manufacture of a multi-component mixture

A combination of 1-propanol (CAS number 71-23-8) and 1-butanol (CAS number 71-36-3) are reacted with 1,4-butanedioic acid (CAS number 110-15-6). This would form 3 products, butanedioic acid, 1,4-dibutyl ester (CAS number 141-03-7), butanedioic acid, 1,4-dipropyl ester (CAS number 925-15-5) and butanedioic acid, 1-butyl 4-propyl ester (CAS number 1032289-95-4). 

The formation of butanedioic acid, 1-butyl 4-propyl ester involved the cross-reaction of 1-propanol and 1-butanol. This mixture does meet the multi-component introduction criteria, as long as the proportions are fixed and they aren’t separated during introduction and use in Australia.

Reaction scheme of 1-propanol (1) and 1-butanol (2) with 1,4-butanedioic acid (3) to produce butanedioic acid, 1,4-dipropyl ester (4), butanedioic acid, 1-butyl 4-propyl ester (5) and butanedioic acid, 1,4-dibutyl ester (6).

Reaction scheme of 1-propanol (1) and 1-butanol (2) with 1,4-butanedioic acid (3) to produce butanedioic acid, 1,4-dipropyl ester (4), butanedioic acid, 1-butyl 4-propyl ester (5) and butanedioic acid, 1,4-dibutyl ester (6). 

What information do I need to provide and keep?  

As well as the information you need for an assessment certificate application, you’ll need to provide and keep records that shows:

  • identity and proportions of all chemicals in the mixture , or information showing the mixture can be analysed to find the proportions
  • how the mixture is manufactured
  • the mixture isn’t separated during introduction and use in Australia

If we approve your application

Each chemical will get its own entry on the Inventory and its own certificate. Importantly, we’ll add a scope of assessment with restrictions stipulating that introduction must only be in a mixture with the other components in the multi-component introduction.  

Was this page helpful?
For broken links or technical issues, please provide as much detail as possible. Do not include your name, email address and other personal or commercially sensitive information.

Keep informed with updates