Pre-introduction report - highest indicative risk is low risk

Reported category

For reported introductions only. Don't submit for listed introductions.

Nil fee

No fee to submit. You must submit before you import or manufacture the chemical.

This guide is designed to help you complete the pre-introduction report form in AICIS Business Services for the type called ‘highest indicative risk is low risk and the other types do not apply’.

Also read 'Before you start your pre-introduction report'

When you shouldn’t submit a pre-introduction report

Do not submit if:

  • you did not categorise your introduction – use our categorisation guide to work out the introduction category and the next steps you must take

  • your introduction is categorised as listed – meaning that your chemical is already on our Inventory and your introduction meets the regulatory obligations specified in the chemical’s ‘Inventory terms of listing’ (if there are any)

When you must submit a pre-introduction report

Submit if one of the following applies:

  1. The chemical you plan to introduce is not on the Inventory and you have worked out that your introduction is in the reported category.

  2. You’re planning to introduce an Inventory-listed chemical outside the parameters of the defined scope of assessment and you have worked out that your introduction is in the reported category.

Record-keeping obligations

Even after you have submitted your pre-introduction report, you are legally required to keep certain records about your introduction. For details see, Record-keeping obligations for reported introductions.

Contents of this guide

Highest indicative risk is low risk - report type

Guide to completing the ‘Report type’ section of the pre-introduction report for ‘highest indicative risk is low risk and the other types do not apply’.

What is the type of your pre-introduction report?

Note: when you select ‘Highest indicative risk is low risk and the other types do not apply’, this means that your introduction is not one of the other types. The other types are:

Do you know the proper name of the industrial chemical? (CAS or IUPAC name)

You, or someone else, must provide your chemical’s proper name, which includes the CAS (Chemical Abstracts Service) or IUPAC (International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry) name for your chemical.

INCI names are not accepted as proper names for chemicals 

Select Yes if you can provide the proper name yourself.

Select No if someone else is going to provide the chemical’s proper name. Click Business look up and enter the AICIS business ID of your chemical data provider (starting with NIC) followed by the chemical data provider contact person’s first and last name. If you don’t have their details, you must contact your chemical data provider as we cannot give you this information.

Highest indicative risk is low risk – chemical identity

Guide to completing the ‘Chemical identity’ section of the pre-introduction report for ‘highest indicative risk is low risk and the other types do not apply’.

What is the proper name of the industrial chemical?

You, or someone else, must provide a CAS name or IUPAC name for your chemical.

Do not enter an INCI name, trade name or marketing name

Is a Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) registry number assigned for the industrial chemical?

Select ‘Yes’ if your chemical has been assigned a number by CAS. You must enter a valid CAS number, either with or without the hyphens, otherwise the following error message will appear “CAS registry number must be a valid CAS Number. E.g. 12-34-0 or 12340”.

Select ‘No’ if your chemical has not been assigned a CAS registry number.

What is the name (or synonym) you use to refer to the industrial chemical?

Enter the names that you use to refer to the chemical, for example an INCI name.

Is the industrial chemical a UVCB substance (a substance of Unknown or Variable composition, Complex reaction products or Biological materials)?

Select ‘Yes’ if your chemical is a UVCB substance. You (or the person who knows this information), must describe the UVCB substance by including at least one of the following:

  • the manufacturing process for the UVCB substance
  • raw material sources of the UVCB substance
  • carbon number ranges for the UVCB substance
  • physical property ranges for the UVCB substance
  • biological sources of the UVCB substance
UVCB description is mandatory for introductions in human health exposure band 4, or environment exposure band 3 or 4. If this does not apply to your introduction, you can enter “not applicable”.

Is the industrial chemical a high molecular weight polymer?

Select ‘Yes’ if your chemical is a polymer with a number average molecular weight that is greater than or equal to 1,000 g/mol, then answer the questions about the polymer molecular weight as requested in the form.

Polymer weight details are mandatory for introductions in human health exposure band 4. If this does not apply to your introduction, you can enter “not applicable”.

Highest indicative risk is low risk – related to introduction

Guide to completing the ‘Related to introduction’ section of the pre-introduction report for ‘highest indicative risk is low risk and the other types do not apply’.

Will the chemical be imported into Australia or manufactured in Australia?

Note: ‘Both import and manufacture’ does not include the scenario where a chemical is imported then reformulated/used in Australia to make a mixture or product. In this scenario select ‘import’.

What is the maximum total volume of the chemical introduced in Australia during a registration year?

Check that the volume range you select is consistent with the information you provide for the human health and environment exposure band sections

Select the range that is the maximum total volume of the chemical that you will introduce into Australia during a registration year:

  • ≤ 25 kg (less than or equal to 25 kg)
  • > 25 kg to ≤ 100 kg (more than 25 kg and less than, or equal to 100 kg)
  • > 100 kg to ≤ 1,000 kg (more than 100 kg and less than, or equal to 1,000 kg)
  • > 1,000 kg to ≤ 10,000 kg (more than 1,000 kg and less than, or equal to 10,000 kg)
  • > 10,000 kg (more than 10,000 kg)

What is the end use of the chemical?

Select all the end use(s) of your chemical from a picklist in the form. This is the same list of options that you may have used to calculate the environment categorisation volume (Step 5.3 from Categorisation Guide) and is also shown below.

Example: If you are introducing a chemical for an end use in cosmetics, the picklist option you need to select “Personal care products not covered by other end uses”, unless your chemical will only be used in products with limited environmental release (for example, nail polish).


List of end uses - product descriptions and examples

Adhesive and sealant products means an end use to fasten other materials together or stop the passage of liquid or gas. Examples include:

  • glues 
  • binders
  • adhesives
  • pastes
  • sealants
  • fillers
  • putties
  • solder and caulking compounds

Apparel and footwear care products means an end use to care for apparel and footwear products intended for consumer and commercial use. Examples include:

  • footwear polishes
  • waxes and stains to waterproof and improve appearance and other desirable properties
  • apparel surface treatment products for water, stain or flame resistance

Arts, crafts and hobby products means an end use in arts, crafts or hobbies. Examples include:

  • crafting paints
  • crafting glue
  • adhesives (e.g. solder and hot-melt adhesives)
  • fixatives
  • finishing spray coatings and modelling clay

Explosive products means an end use for producing a sudden expansion, usually accompanied by production of heat and large changes in pressure. Examples include:

  • pyrotechnics
  • high explosives and propellants
  • igniters
  • primers
  • initiatory
  • illuminants
  • smoke and decoy flares
  • incendiaries

Fuel, oil, fuel oil additives and related products means an end use as:

  • liquid fuel in containers used for cooking, heating or for power in vehicles or appliances, or
  • a fuel additive to inhibit corrosion, provide lubrication, increase efficiency of use, or decrease production of undesirable by-products.

Examples of liquid fuels include:

  • gasoline
  • diesel fuels
  • kerosene
  • lamp oils

Examples of fuel oil additives include:

  • stabilisers
  • anti-knock agents
  • corrosion inhibitors
  • detergents
  • fuel dyes
  • oxygenates
  • antioxidants
  • odour agents

Lubricant and grease products means an end use in a liquid, paste or spray to reduce friction, heat generation and wear between solid surfaces. Examples include:

  • engine oils
  • transmission, brake and hydraulic fluids
  • gear oils
  • calcium, sodium, lithium, and silicone-based greases

Personal care products – limited environmental release means an end use in solid or hardening personal care products (including cosmetics) that are primarily disposed of to landfill. Examples include:

  • baby wipes
  • facial tissues
  • nail care products including nail polish and remover

Tattoo ink products means an end use in a combination of industrial chemicals that contains one or more colouring agents and is applied to the dermal layer of the skin for the purposes of colouring the skin. Examples include:

  • pigments
  • dyes
  • resins

Paint and coating products means an end use to paint or coat substrates intended for consumer or commercial use. Examples include: 

  • decorative coatings 
  • automotive coatings
  • transportation coatings
  • wood finishes
  • powder coatings
  • coil coatings
  • packaging finishes
  • general industrial coatings
  • automotive refinish
  • industrial maintenance and protective coatings
  • marine coatings
  • thinners
  • removers

Plastic and polymer products means an end use in production of plastics or polymers. Examples include:

  • monomers
  • initiators
  • additives

Construction products not covered by other end uses means an end use in construction materials, except where another scenario covers the end use. Examples include:

  • additives in cements and dry mortar
  • additives to bitumen for road repair
  • internal release agents for thermo-set laminating resins
  • resins in particle board manufacture
  • wood substitutes used to make mouldings
  • resins used in the production of composite materials

Fabric, textile and leather products not covered by other end uses means an end use to impart colour and other desirable properties onto fabric, textiles, and leather products that are intended for consumer or commercial use.

These properties include:

  • water/soil/stain repellence
  • wrinkle resistance
  • flame resistance

Examples of this type of product include:

  • textile dyes
  • textile finishing agents
  • leather tanning products
  • leather dyes
  • leather finishing agents, leather conditioner and surface treatment products

Electronic products means an end use in the production of electronic components. Examples include:

  • chemicals in vapour deposition
  • electroless plating
  • electroplating
  • etching
  • high vacuum evaporation/sputtering
  • laminate processing
  • soldering
  • photolithography

Ink, toner and colourant products means an end use for:

  • writing
  • printing
  • creating an image on paper and other substrates
  • applying to substrates to change their colour or hide images

Examples of this type of product include:

  • pigmented liquid
  • toners or powders used in copy machines and toner/printer cartridges
  • inks used in writing equipment
  • inks for stamps and correction fluids and tapes

This category does not include pigments and colourants added to paints and coatings.

Air care products means an end use to odorise or deodorise indoor air in homes, offices, motor vehicles, and enclosed spaces and intended for consumer or commercial use. Examples include:

  • aerosol sprays
  • liquid/solid/gel diffusers
  • air fresheners
  • scented candles
  • incense

Anti-freeze and de-icing products means an end use:

  • as an additive to fluids, especially water, to reduce the freezing point of the mixture, or
  • applied to surfaces to melt or prevent build-up of ice

Examples of this type of product include:

  • anti-freeze liquids
  • de-icing liquids (windshield de-icers, aircraft de-icers)
  • de-icing solids (ice melting crystals)
  • lock de-icers

Automotive care products means an end use (intended for consumer or commercial use) to clean and care for exterior and interior surfaces of automotive vehicles. Examples include:

  • car waxes
  • polishes
  • waterproofing products for windshield or automotive window glass
  • cleaners
  • sealers
  • car wash solutions
  • vinyl/rubber/plastic protectants
  • automotive carpet and upholstery cleaners
  • wheel and tyre care products
  • exterior trim protectants
  • touch-up paint products

Cleaning and furniture care products means an end use (intended for consumer or commercial use) to:

  • remove dirt, grease, stains, and foreign matter from furniture and furnishings
  • cleanse, sanitise, bleach, scour, polish, protect, or improve the appearance of surfaces

Examples include:

  • cleaners used on glass, floors, tub and tile, ovens and drains
  • scouring powders
  • dusting products
  • waxes
  • polishes
  • stain repellent sprays

Laundry and dishwashing products means an end use in liquid, granular, gel or unit dose packets/tablets to:

  • remove food residue from dishes
  • remove dirt from textiles
  • enhance properties of textiles
  • remove stains from textiles

Examples include:

  • dishwashing detergents and laundry detergents
  • stain removers and fabric enhancers
  • bleach
  • rinse aids
  • lime and rust removers
  • dry cleaning products used in non-aqueous cleaning processes

Extractive products not covered by other end uses means an end use in:

  • mining
  • onshore drilling
  • related activities such as extraction, cementing, hydraulic fracturing, refining

These scenarios do not include end use in offshore drilling. This end use is a designated kind of release into the environment (for which you do not calculate an ECV).

Paper products means an end use in paper production. Examples include:

  • effluent treatment chemicals
  • maintenance chemicals
  • deposit and cleaning agents
  • defoamers
  • surfactants
  • polymeric retention aids
  • coagulants
  • clay
  • resins

Personal care products not covered by other end uses means an end use for cosmetic use, except those covered under the “personal care products - limited environmental release end use” scenario. Examples include:

  • bath and shower products
  • make-up products
  • hair, oral and skin care products
  • secondary sunscreen products
  • deodorants
  • perfumes

Photographic products means an end use (for consumer or commercial use) to take photographic images, develop and process film, and make photographic prints. Examples include:

  • processing solutions (for developing, stopping, and fixing photos)
  • chemicals used in the manufacture or processing of film or photographic paper

Water treatment products means an end use to treat water in cooling and heating systems (including industrial heat-exchanger systems) and potable water supplies. Examples include:

  • chemicals used in pH buffers
  • scale and corrosion inhibitors
  • flocculating agents
  • ion exchange resins

This scenario does not include end uses to treat municipal water supplies or other large-scale water supplies for human or animal consumptions or irrigation. These end uses involve a designated kind of release into the environment.

Personal vaporiser products means an end use in a device that is intended to produce a vapour or aerosol that is delivered into a person’s body when the person inhales through the device. Examples include:

  • e-cigarettes
  • e-cigars
  • e-hookah pens
  • e-pens
  • e-pipes
  • vape pens

Specify the end use of the chemical

You must specify the end use of the chemical for each product type(s) that you selected in the question above.

Example: Company XYZ wants to introduce a chemical for use in laundry detergent, shampoo and hand soap. In their pre-introduction report, they select both “Personal care products not covered by other end uses” and “Laundry and dishwashing products” from the end uses picklist. For this question they specify that the chemical will have end uses in “laundry detergent, shampoo and hand soap”.

Does the introduction belong to a specified class?

‘Specified class’ refers to introductions that we consider to be of higher concern to human health or the environment because of greater potential for particular hazards or exposure.

Select ‘Yes‘ if any of the following applies to the introduction of your chemical:

Specified classes of introductions have additional or different requirements relating to hazard information, reporting or record keeping.

Some ‘specified classes of introduction’ cannot be in the reported category. You must use our categorisation guide and extra resources to work out whether your specified class of introduction can be categorised as reported. If you’re still unsure whether your specified class of introduction can be ‘reported’, contact us.

Example: Chemicals R Us Pty Ltd plan to import a chemical that contains a sequence of 4 to 20 fully fluorinated carbon atoms. The highest indicative risk for this introduction is medium to high risk, therefore it does not meet the criteria to be a reported introduction.

Does the introduction involve 'a designated kind of release to the environment’?

A designated kind of release into the environment means:

Release of household wastewater (including from use of cosmetics) into waterways or the sewage system is not a ‘designated kind of release into the environment’.

If your introduction only has an end use in cosmetics, select No to this question.

Will the industrial chemical have an end use in cosmetics?

If you select ‘Yes’ you must select 1 statement that applies to your introduction relating to the use of animal test data.

Option 1 – I did NOT use animal test data from tests conducted on or after 1 July 2020 to determine the highest indicative risk for the chemical.

Select this option if either of these apply.

  • You did not use any animal test data to work out the highest indicative risk of your introduction.
  • You used animal test data to work out the highest indicative risk of your introduction, but the animal tests were all conducted before 1 July 2020.

Option 2 – I will introduce the chemical for an end use solely in cosmetics AND I used animal test data from tests conducted on or after 1 July 2020 to determine the highest indicative risk for the chemical in the circumstances mentioned in the General Rules Section 34.

Select this option if all of the following apply.

  1. Your chemical will only have an end use in cosmetics (and will not have any other end uses).
  2. You used animal test data from tests conducted on or after 1 July 2020 to work out the highest indicative risk of your introduction.
  3. You meet one of 3 exception criteria that allows cosmetics introducers to use animal test data under limited circumstances – exception 1, exception 2 or exception 3.

Option 3: I will introduce the chemical for multiple end uses (including an end use in cosmetics) AND I used animal test data from tests conducted on or after 1 July 2020 to determine the highest indicative risk for the chemical. This animal test data is of a kind mentioned in the General Rules Section 31.

Select this option if all of the following apply.

  1. Your chemical will have several end uses, which includes cosmetics.
  2. You used animal test data from tests conducted on or after 1 July 2020 to work out the highest indicative risk of your introduction.
  3. You meet one of 4 exception criteria that allows cosmetics introducers to use animal test data under limited circumstances – exception 1, exception 2, exception 3 or exception 4.

See: Animal test data - when it can and can’t be used and when you need pre-approval

Highest indicative risk is low risk – hazard and exposure

Guide to completing the ‘Hazard and exposure’ section of the pre-introduction report for ‘highest indicative risk is low risk and the other types do not apply’.

When working out the indicative human health and environment risk for your introduction, you must check the definitions of each human health and environment hazard characteristic. Note that our hazard characteristic definitions are broader than the definitions or classification criteria under the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS).

What you need to know about human health hazard characteristics

The human health hazard characteristics you need to consider vary and depend on your introduction’s human health exposure band.

It is not enough to determine the indicative human health risk based on the hazard characteristics that you know about your chemical. For example, you can't just rely on information in a Safety Data Sheet.

Most of the time, to categorise correctly, you need to prove that your chemical does not have certain hazard characteristics.

The Categorisation Guidelines (Chapter 6) contains human health hazard characteristic definitions and how you can prove your chemical does not have the hazard characteristics. Tip: read Step 4.4 of our categorisation guide to help you understand the requirements in the Categorisation Guidelines.


Download: 


If the human health exposure band for your introduction is:

  • 2 or 3, you need to be able to prove that your chemical does not have any of the hazard characteristics in human health hazard band C
  • 4, you need to be able to prove that your chemical does not have any of the hazard characteristics in human health hazard bands C and B.
You must have permission to use information that you relied on to demonstrate the absence of hazard characteristics. If we ask you for the information that you relied on to categorise your introduction, you need to provide us with the detailed information, including full study reports, of the kind specified in the Categorisation Guidelines. Therefore, you need to make sure you have access to this information and are able to provide it to us.

Does your chemical have a human health hazard characteristic?

You need to tell us whether or not your chemical has any human health hazard characteristics that are known to you. If you don’t know, you’ll have to indicate that as well.

Make sure that the hazard characteristics you select are consistent with characteristics permitted for a reported introduction in your exposure band.

For example, if the human health exposure band for your introduction is 4, then you shouldn’t be selecting hazard characteristics in human health hazard bands B or C – if the chemical is known to have these characteristics, the introduction should be categorised as assessed (not reported) and you need to apply for an assessment certificate to introduce the chemical.

If you answer yes, you need to select what these are from a picklist (can be more than one):

Human health hazard band A 

  • Acute toxicity (harmful)
  • Skin irritation
  • Eye irritation
  • Specific target organ toxicity after a single exposure (harmful or transient effects)
  • Aspiration hazard
  • High molecular weight polymer that has lung overloading potential

Human health hazard band B

  • Specific target organ toxicity after repeated exposure
  • Acute toxicity (fatal or toxic)
  • Skin sensitisation
  • Skin corrosion
  • Eye damage
  • Specific target organ toxicity after a single exposure (significant toxicity)
  • Corrosive to the respiratory tract
  • Respiratory sensitisation
  • High molecular weight polymer that is water absorbing

Human health hazard band C

  • Genetic toxicity
  • Adverse effects mediated by an endocrine mode of action
  • Reproductive toxicity
  • Developmental toxicity
  • Carcinogenicity

What you need to know about environment hazard characteristics

The environment hazard characteristics you need to consider vary and depend on your introduction’s environment exposure band. For more help, take a look at Step 5.4 (Work out your environment hazard characteristics) in our guide to categorising your chemical importation and manufacture.

It is not enough to determine the indicative environment risk based on the hazard characteristics that you know about your chemical. For example, you can’t just rely on information in a Safety Data Sheet.

Most of the time, to categorise correctly, you need to prove that your chemical does not have certain hazard characteristics. You must make sure you check the environment hazard characteristic definitions in the Categorisation Guidelines. We also tell you in the Categorisation Guidelines how you can prove your chemical does not have the hazard characteristics.

If the environment exposure band for your introduction is:

  • 1 or 2, you need to be able to prove that your chemical does not have any of the hazard characteristics in environment hazard band D
  • 3, you need to be able to prove that your chemical does not have any of the hazard characteristics in environment hazard bands D and C
  • 4, you need to be able to prove that your chemical does not have any of the hazard characteristics in environment hazard bands D, C and B.
You must have permission to use information that you relied on to demonstrate the absence of hazard characteristics. If we ask you for the information that you relied on to categorise your introduction, you need to provide us with the detailed information, including full study reports, of the kind specified in the Categorisation Guidelines. Therefore, you need to make sure you have access to this information and are able to provide it to us.

Does your chemical have an environment hazard characteristic?

You’ll need to tell us whether or not your chemical has any environment hazard characteristics that are known to you. If you don’t know, you’ll have to indicate that as well.

If you answer yes, you need to select what these are from a picklist (can be more than one):

Environment hazard band A

  • Harmful to any aquatic life 
  • Industrial chemical (other than a polymer) that does not meet the criteria for ready biodegradability
  • Bioaccumulation potential
  • Polymer that is not stable
  • Polymer that does not have a low cationic density
  • Contains aluminium, chromium, copper, nickel, selenium, silver or zinc

Environment hazard band B

  • Toxic to any aquatic life

Environment hazard band C

  • Persistent and bioaccumulative
  • Very toxic to any aquatic life

Environment hazard band D

  • Persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic 
  • Adverse effects mediated by an endocrine mode of action
  • Synthetic greenhouse gas 
  • Ozone depleting chemical
  • Contains arsenic, cadmium, lead or mercury

What is the human health exposure band for the introduction?

Select your answer: human health exposure band 1, 2, 3 or 4. This is the human health exposure band that you determined as part of working out your introduction category.

What criteria did you use to determine the human health exposure band?

Select your answer: item number 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 or 7 for your introduction. See below for the description of each item number as set out in  Schedule 1, Part 1, Clause 1(1) of the Industrial Chemicals (General) Rules 2019.

Select item number ‘1' for this question if the human health exposure band for your introduction is 1 because all of the following apply:

  • The introduction of your chemical does not involve a ‘designated kind of human exposure’ – this means you are not introducing a chemical with an end use in tattoo inks or personal vaporisers.
  • The introduction of your chemical is not for any consumer end use.
  • The concentration of your chemical at introduction and at all end uses is less than 0.1%.

Select item number ‘2' for this question if the human health exposure band for your introduction is 2 because all of the following apply:

  • The introduction of your chemical does not involve a ‘designated kind of human exposure’ – this means you are not introducing a chemical with an end use in tattoo inks or personal vaporisers.
  • The human health categorisation volume for your chemical does not exceed 25kg.
  • Item number 1 does not apply to your introduction.

Select item number ‘3' for this question if the human health exposure band for your introduction is 2, because all of the following apply:

  • The introduction of your chemical does not involve a ‘designated kind of human exposure’ – this means you are not introducing a chemical with an end use in tattoo inks or personal vaporisers.
  • The introduction of your chemical is either for a consumer end use only or for multiple end uses, including a consumer end use.
  • The concentration of your chemical at introduction and at all end uses is less than 0.1%.

Select item number ‘4' for this question if the human health exposure band for your introduction is 3, because all of the following apply:

  • The introduction of your chemical does not involve a ‘designated kind of human exposure’ – this means you are not introducing a chemical with an end use in tattoo inks or personal vaporisers.
  • The human health categorisation volume for your chemical does not exceed 100kg.
  • Item numbers 1, 2 and 3 do not apply to your introduction.

Select item number ‘5' for this question if the human health exposure band for your introduction is 3, because all of the following apply:

  • The introduction of your chemical does not involve a ‘designated kind of human exposure’ – this means you are not introducing a chemical with an end use in tattoo inks or personal vaporisers.
  • The concentration of your chemical at introduction and at all end uses is 1% or less.
  • Item numbers 1, 2 and 3 do not apply to your introduction.

Select item number ‘6' for this question if the human health exposure band for your introduction is 4, because all of the following apply:

  • The introduction of your chemical does not involve a ‘designated kind of human exposure’ – this means you are not introducing a chemical with an end use in tattoo inks or personal vaporisers.
  • The human health categorisation volume for your chemical is greater than 100kg.
  • Item numbers 1, 3 and 5 do not apply to your introduction.

Select item number ‘7' for this question if the human health exposure band for your introduction is 4, because the following applies:

  • The introduction of your chemical involves a ‘designated kind of human exposure’ – this means you are introducing a chemical with an end use in tattoo inks or personal vaporisers

What is the environment exposure band for the introduction?

Select your answer: environment exposure band 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5. This is the environment exposure band that you determined as part of working out your introduction category.

What criteria did you use to determine the environment exposure band?

Select your answer: item number 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 for your introduction. See below for the description of each item number as set out in Schedule 1, Part 2, Clause 3(1) of the Industrial Chemicals (General) Rules 2019.

Select item number ‘1' for this question if the environment exposure band for your introduction is 1, because all of the following apply:

  • The introduction of your chemical does not involve a ‘designated kind of release into the environment’.
  • The environment categorisation volume for your chemical does not exceed 25kg.

Select item number ‘2' for this question if the environment exposure band for your introduction is 2, because all of the following apply:

  • The introduction of your chemical does not involve a ‘designated kind of release into the environment’.
  • The environment categorisation volume for your chemical is greater than 25kg but no more than 1,000kg

Select item number ‘3' for this question if the environment exposure band for your introduction is 3, because all of the following apply:

  • The introduction of your chemical does not involve a ‘designated kind of release into the environment’.
  • The environment categorisation volume for your chemical is greater than 1,000kg but no more than 10,000kg.

Select item number ‘4' for this question if the environment exposure band for your introduction is 4, because the following applies:

  • The introduction of your chemical involves a ‘designated kind of release into the environment’.

Select item number ‘5' for this question if the environment exposure band for your introduction is 4, because the following applies:

  • The environment categorisation volume for your chemical is greater than 10,000kg.

Highest indicative risk is low risk – declaration

Guide to completing the ‘Declaration’ section of the pre-introduction report for ‘highest indicative risk is low risk and the other types do not apply’.

Are you flagging any other information as confidential?

If you select Yes to this question, specify the information that you are flagging for protection. By selecting Yes you are not formally applying for confidential business information (CBI), rather you are indicating to us that you would like this information to be treated confidentially.

You are also acknowledging that if we decide to publish your flagged information and send you a ‘section 113 notice’ (under the Industrial Chemicals Act 2019), then you may need to apply for CBI in the AICIS Business Services Portal.

Learn more about flagging information as confidential and ‘section 113 notices’

Declaration

Before you can submit you need to declare the following:

  • You have had regard to such information as is known to you that demonstrates that the industrial chemical has hazard characteristics that are relevant for determining the highest indicative risk for the introduction.

  • You have had regard to the information detailed in the Industrial Chemicals Categorisation Guidelines to demonstrate the absence of certain hazard characteristics, as required for introductions where the highest indicative risk is determined (in whole or in part) on the basis of the absence of certain hazard characteristics.

  • The information you have given is true, correct and complete. Giving false or misleading information is a serious offence.