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Welcome to the website of the Australian Industrial Chemicals Introduction Scheme (AICIS). We started on 1 July 2020. Read about us.

Record keeping for reported introductions - internationally assessed

For introductions of chemicals that are internationally assessed for human health and/or the environment, you’ll need to keep certain records - and provide them within 20 working days if we ask for them.

Record-keeping requirements for introductions of chemicals that are internationally assessed

Before you read this page’s content, make sure you’ve already read and understood:

Records you must keep

The following tables provide information about the records you must keep for introductions of chemicals that are internationally assessed. The type of records you must keep depends on whether you know the Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CAS number) or the proper name (CAS or IUPAC) for your chemical. You must provide these records within 20 working days if we ask for them.

  • Table 1: Introductions of chemicals that are internationally assessed for human health and the environment 
  • Table 2: Introductions of chemicals that are internationally assessed for human health only (and are low or very low risk for the environment) 
  • Table 3: Introductions of chemicals that are internationally assessed for the environment only (and are low or very low risk for human health)

Table 1: Introductions of chemicals that are internationally assessed for human health and the environment

Records to keep if you know the CAS number and/or proper name for your chemical Records to keep if you DO NOT know the proper name for your chemical

1a. If you know the CAS number, a record of it, plus the CAS name or INCI name OR

1b. If you know the proper name (CAS or IUPAC) but no CAS number is assigned - a record of the proper name

2. The names of any products containing your chemical that you have imported into Australia

3. Records to prove your introduction is NOT covered by any of the provisions of section 25, items 1 - 3 of the table in subsection 28(1) or items 1 - 5 of the table in subsection 29(1) of the General Rules.

4. Records to prove the total volume of your chemical introduced in a registration year does not exceed the volume stated in your pre-introduction report as the maximum volume you intended to introduce

5. Records to prove any known hazard classification for your chemical.

6. Records to prove how you are meeting any restrictions or conditions associated with the introduction or use of your chemical in the overseas jurisdiction.

7. Records to prove how you worked out that the risks to human health and the environment from the introduction  and use of your chemical are no higher in Australia than in the overseas jurisdiction.

1. The names you use to refer to your chemical (including the names given in your pre-introduction report)

2. The names of any products containing your chemical that you have imported into Australia

3. A written undertaking from the supplier or manufacturer that the introduction of your chemical isn’t covered by any of the provisions of section 25, items 1 - 3 of the table in subsection 28(1) or items 1 - 5 of the table in subsection 29(1) of the General Rules, and that the person who holds the information will give us the records to prove this, if we ask for them.

4. Records to prove the total volume of your chemical introduced in a registration year does not exceed the volume stated in your pre-introduction report as the maximum volume you intended to introduce

5. Records to prove any known hazard classification for your chemical.

6. Records to prove how you are meeting any restrictions or conditions associated with the introduction or use of your chemical in the overseas jurisdiction.

7. Records to prove how you worked out that the risks to human health and the environment from the introduction and use of your chemical are no higher in Australia than in the overseas jurisdiction.

Table 2: Introductions of chemicals that are internationally assessed for human health only (and are low or very low risk for the environment)

Records to keep if you know the CAS number and/or proper name for your chemical Records to keep if you DO NOT know the proper name for your chemical

1a. If you know the CAS number, a record of it, plus the CAS name or INCI name OR

1b. If you know the proper name (CAS or IUPAC) but no CAS number is assigned - a record of the proper name

2. The names of any products containing your chemical that you have imported into Australia

3. Records to prove your introduction is NOT covered by any of the provisions of section 25, items 1 - 3 of the table in  subsection 28(1) or items 1 - 5 of the table in subsection 29(1) of the General Rules.

4. If the applicable environment exposure band criteria for your introduction include an environment categorisation volume (ECV) upper limit - a record of the ECV for your chemical and records to prove the ECV doesn’t exceed that specified in the exposure band criteria.

5. Which type of designated kind of release into the environment occurs (if any)

6. Records to prove any known hazard classification for your chemical.

7. Detailed information, including full study reports, of the kind specified in the Guidelines to demonstrate the absence of certain environment hazard characteristics that would otherwise render the introduction medium to high risk. If you don’t have this information, keep a record of the outcomes of the information specified in the Guidelines plus a written undertaking from the person who has the information that they will give us the records if we ask for them.

8. Records to prove how you are meeting any restrictions or conditions associated with the introduction or use of your chemical in the overseas jurisdiction.

9. Records to prove how you worked out that the risks to human health from the introduction and use of your chemical are no higher in Australia than in the overseas jurisdiction.

10. Records needed if your introduction is one of the following specified classes of introduction:

Introductions that involve a designated kind of release into the environment — a record of the:

a. location of the release into the environment (including all receiving water bodies); and

b. frequency of the release into the environment

Biochemicals — a record of:

a. the concentration of any remaining viable cell or cellular components of the organisms used to produce the biochemical; and

b. information on any known adverse effects of any remaining viable cell or cellular components of the organisms used to produce the biochemical

GM products — a record of:

a. the name of the genetically modified organism from which the GM product was derived or produced; and

b. information on any genetically modified organism that remains in the GM product as an impurity

 

1. The names you use to refer to your chemical (including the names given in your pre-introduction report)

2. The names of any products containing your chemical that you have imported into Australia

3. A written undertaking from the supplier or manufacturer that the introduction of your chemical isn’t covered by any of the provisions of section 25, items 1 - 3 of the table in subsection 28(1) or items 1 - 5 of the table in subsection 29(1) of the General Rules, and that the person who holds the information will give us the records to prove this, if we ask for them.

4. If the applicable environment exposure band criteria for your introduction include an environment categorisation volume (ECV) upper limit - a record of the ECV for your chemical and records to prove the ECV doesn’t exceed that specified in the exposure band criteria.

5. Which type of designated kind of release into the environment occurs (if any)

6. Records to prove any known hazard classification for your chemical.

7. Detailed information, including full study reports, of the kind specified in the Guidelines to demonstrate the absence of certain environment hazard characteristics that would otherwise render the introduction medium to high risk. If you don’t have this information, keep a record of the outcomes of the information specified in the Guidelines plus a written undertaking from the person who has the information that they will give us the records if we ask for them.

8. Records to prove how you are meeting any restrictions or conditions associated with the introduction or use of your chemical in the overseas jurisdiction.

9. Records to prove how you worked out that the risks to human health from the introduction and use of your chemical are no higher in Australia than in the overseas jurisdiction.

10. Records needed if your introduction is one of the following specified classes of introduction:

Introductions that involve a designated kind of release into the environment — a record of the:

a. location of the release into the environment (including all receiving water bodies); and

b. frequency of the release into the environment

Biochemicals — a record of:

a. the concentration of any remaining viable cell or cellular components of the organisms used to produce the biochemical; and

b. information on any known adverse effects of any remaining viable cell or cellular components of the organisms used to produce the biochemical

GM products — a record of:

a. the name of the genetically modified organism from which the GM product was derived or produced; and

b. information on any genetically modified organism that remains in the GM product as an impurity

Table 3: Introductions of chemicals that are internationally assessed for the environment only (and are low or very low risk for human health)

Records to keep if you know the CAS number and/or proper name for your chemical Records to keep if you DO NOT know the proper name for your chemical

1a. If you know the CAS number, a record of it, plus the CAS name or INCI name OR

1b. If you know the proper name (CAS or IUPAC) but no CAS number is assigned - a record of the proper name

2. The names of any products containing your chemical that you have imported into Australia

3. Records to prove your introduction is NOT covered by any of the provisions of section 25, items 1 - 3 of the table in subsection 28(1) or items 1 - 5 of the table in subsection 29(1) of the General Rules.

4. Records to prove the polymer molecular weight details for your chemical (if your introduction is of a high molecular weight polymer and its human health exposure band is 4)

5. Records to prove the total volume of your chemical introduced in a registration year does not exceed the volume stated in your pre-introduction report as the maximum volume you intended to introduce

6. If the applicable human health exposure band criteria for your introduction include a human health categorisation volume (HHCV) upper limit - a record of the HHCV for your chemical and records to prove the HHCV doesn’t exceed that specified in the exposure band criteria.

7. Records to prove any known hazard classification for your chemical.

8. Detailed information, including full study reports, of the kind specified in the Guidelines to demonstrate the absence of certain human health hazard characteristics that would otherwise render the introduction medium to high risk. If you don’t have this information, keep a record of the outcomes of the information specified in the Guidelines plus a written undertaking from the person who has the information that they will give us the records if we ask for them.

9. Records to prove how you are meeting any restrictions or conditions associated with the introduction or use of your chemical in the overseas jurisdiction.

10. Records to prove how you worked out that the risks to the environment from the introduction and use of your chemical are no higher in Australia than in the overseas jurisdiction.

11. Records needed if your introduction is one of the following specified classes of introduction:

Biochemicals — a record of:

a. the concentration of any remaining viable cell or cellular components of the organisms used to produce the biochemical; and

b. information on any known adverse effects of any remaining viable cell or cellular components of the organisms used to produce the biochemical

GM products — a record of:

a. the name of the genetically modified organism from which the GM product was derived or produced; and

b. information on any genetically modified organism that remains in the GM product as an impurity

UV filters in human health exposure band 4, a record of:

a. toxicokinetics information about the chemical (see Guidelines); and

b. photostability information about the chemical (see Guidelines)

Where the end use is in an article with food contact, a record of:

a. any approval (if known) for your chemical for an end use in an article with food contact in another country by an agency or authority of that country; and

b. the potential for your chemical to migrate to food (see Guidelines)

Where the end use is in an article that is a children’s toy or children’s care product, a record of:

a. whether the article can be placed in the mouth; and

b. if so, the potential for the chemical to be released into the mouth during end use or mouthing (see Guidelines)

1. The names you use to refer to your chemical (including the names given in your pre-introduction report)

2. The names of any products containing your chemical that you have imported into Australia

3. A written undertaking from the supplier or manufacturer that the introduction of your chemical isn’t covered by any of the provisions of section 25, items 1 - 3 of the table in subsection 28(1) or items 1 - 5 of the table in subsection 29(1) of the General Rules, and that the person who holds the information will give us the records to prove this, if we ask for them.

4. A written undertaking from the supplier or manufacturer that the introduction is of a high molecular weight polymer (if applicable, and the human health exposure band is 4) and the person who holds the information will give us the records to prove this, if we ask for them.

5. Records to prove the total volume of your chemical introduced in a registration year does not exceed the volume stated in your pre-introduction report as the maximum volume you intended to introduce

6. If the applicable human health exposure band criteria for your introduction include a human health categorisation volume (HHCV) upper limit – a record of the HHCV for your chemical and records to prove the HHCV doesn’t exceed that specified in the exposure band criteria.

7. Records to prove any known hazard classification for your chemical.

8. Detailed information, including full study reports, of the kind specified in the Guidelines to demonstrate the absence of certain human health hazard characteristics that would otherwise render the introduction medium to high risk. If you don’t have this information, keep a record of the outcomes of the information specified in the Guidelines plus a written undertaking from the person who has the information that they will give us the records if we ask for them.

9. Records to prove how you are meeting any restrictions or conditions associated with the introduction or use of your chemical in the overseas jurisdiction.

10. Records to prove how you worked out that the risks to the environment from the introduction and use of your chemical are no higher in Australia than in the overseas jurisdiction.

11. Records needed if your introduction is one of the following specified classes of introduction:

Biochemicals — a record of: a. the concentration of any remaining viable cell or cellular components of the organisms used to produce the biochemical; and

b. information on any known adverse effects of any remaining viable cell or cellular components of the organisms used to produce the biochemical

GM products — a record of:

a. the name of the genetically modified organism from which the GM product was derived or produced; and

b. information on any genetically modified organism that remains in the GM product as an impurity

UV filters in human health exposure band 4, a record of:

a. toxicokinetics information about the chemical (see Guidelines); and

b. photostability information about the chemical (see Guidelines)

Where the end use is in an article with food contact, a record of:

a. any approval (if known) for your chemical for an end use in an article with food contact in another country by an agency or authority of that country; and

b. the potential for your chemical to migrate to food (see Guidelines)

Where the end use is in an article that is a children’s toy or children’s care product, a record of:

a. whether the article can be placed in the mouth; and

b. if so, the potential for the chemical to be released into the mouth during end use or mouthing (see Guidelines)

Download the record-keeping checklists

Our record-keeping checklists indicate the type and level of information we expect to receive for each of the requirements in the tables above, but it’s not meant to be an exhaustive list.

They also expand on the requirements for item 3 in the tables above - records to prove your introduction is NOT covered by any of the provisions of section 25, items 1 - 3 of the table in subsection 28(1) or items 1 - 5 of the table in subsection 29(1) of the General Rules.

For example: item 3 of the tables in subsection 28(1) and 29(1) is related to chemicals at the nanoscale. In the checklists, we indicate that you need records to prove one of the following:

  • your chemical isn’t introduced as a solid or in dispersion (if applicable). We’ll accept an SDS or product information sheet that indicates the appearance.
  • the definition of “not soluble” (see Guidelines) is not met for your chemical. We’ll accept a study report.
  • your chemical doesn’t consist of particles in an unbound state or as an aggregate or agglomerate, at least 50% of which (by number size distribution) have at least one external dimension in the nanoscale. We’ll accept a study report.
  • that the introduction of the nanoscale portion of the chemical is incidental to the non-nanoscale portion. We’ll accept a justification for this (with reference to the items in subsection 28(2) and 29(2) of the General Rules).

*Download ‘Checklist – Internationally assessed for human health and the environment’ (PDF, 424KB)

*Download ‘Checklist – Internationally assessed for human health only and low risk for the environment’ (PDF, 498KB)

*Download ‘Checklist – Internationally assessed for the environment only and low risk for human health) (PDF, 491KB)

We aim to provide documents in an accessible format. If you're having problems using a document with your accessibility tools, please contact us for help.

Examples of information you can provide on request

We’ll soon add examples to show how you can satisfy our request to provide records for these reported introduction types. In the meantime, see our examples for introductions where the highest indicative risk is low risk.

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