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Welcome to the website of the Australian Industrial Chemicals Introduction Scheme (AICIS). We started on 1 July 2020. Read about us.

Categorisation of chemicals in cosmetics

Extra information to help categorise the importation and manufacture (introduction) of chemicals for use in cosmetics.

Have you checked if your chemical is on our Inventory? If your chemical is on our Inventory and your introduction meets any terms of the Inventory listing, your introduction is categorised as a ‘listed’ introduction. Read about listed introductions.

Who should read this?

Importers and manufacturers (introducers) of industrial chemicals (and products that release industrial chemicals) that are for use in cosmetics. This guidance will help you work out whether your introduction will be an exempted, reported or assessed introduction. You must read this in conjunction with our categorisation guide.

What is a cosmetic?

For our definition of a cosmetic, see our cosmetics and soaps guidance or use our decision tool.

Is your introduction exempted, reported or assessed?

You must work out if your introduction meets the criteria for the exempted or reported categories by going through steps 1-6 of the categorisation guide. If your introduction does not meet the criteria for the exempted or reported categories, it will be an assessed introduction.

Note, as chemicals in cosmetics are available to the general public, you cannot apply for a commercial evaluation authorisation for the introduction of your chemical.

Notes:

You need to know if your introduction is a ‘specified class of introduction’. There may be additional or different requirements when working out your category of introduction as well as additional record keeping obligations.

If you are introducing a chemical in a flavour or fragrance blend, your introduction may be automatically reported.

See Categorisation of chemicals in flavour or fragrance blends for more information.

If your chemical will be introduced for research trials on people (for example, consumer research), then your introduction doesn’t meet our automatically exempted or reported criteria for chemicals that will only be used in research and development.

You introduction may still be exempted or reported if it meets other criteria. For example, you work out your introduction category using steps 4-6 of the categorisation guide.

What is the human health exposure band?

If your chemical will also have an end use in tattoo inks or a personal vaporiser (such as e-cigarettes), the human health exposure band for your introduction is 4.

See Categorisation of chemicals in tattoo inks or Categorisation of chemicals in e-cigarettes and personal vaporisers for further information.

Otherwise, the human health exposure band for your introduction could be 2, 3 or 4, depending on the human health categorisation volume (HHCV) for your chemical and/or its concentration at introduction and end use.
If your chemical will only have end uses in cosmetics, the HHCV for your introduction will be the same as the total volume of your chemical that you will introduce in a registration year.

If your chemical will have other end uses, you can work out your HHCV to see which human health exposure band applies to your introduction. If you do this, the HHCV for your introduction may be less than (or equal to) the total volume of your chemical that you will introduce in a registration year.

The human health exposure band is 2 if the:

  • HHCV for your introduction is ≤25 kg or
  • concentration of your chemical at introduction AND at all end uses will be <0.1%.

The human health exposure band is 3 if the:

  • HHCV for your introduction is ≤100 kg or
  • concentration of your chemical at introduction AND at all end uses will be ≤1%.

The human health exposure band is 4 if the scenarios described for exposure bands 2 and 3 do not apply to your introduction.

Information you need to show that your chemical does not have human health hazard characteristics

Read Step 4.4 of the Categorisation Guide

Use of animal test data for chemicals in cosmetics

We do not require you to have data to demonstrate the absence of hazard characteristics for many introductions (for example, PLCs and those that fall into lower human health exposure bands). We outline the circumstances where we do require information to demonstrate the absence of hazard characteristics to categorise your introduction in the Categorisation Guide. For each hazard characteristic we provide details of all acceptable alternatives that you can use instead of animal test data.

Note:
If your introduction is a “specified class of introduction” (for example, introductions of UV filters), you may need additional or different information to show your chemical doesn’t have particular human health hazard characteristics.

What is the environment exposure band?

The environment exposure band for your introduction could be 1, 2, 3 or 4.

Release into the environment from end use in cosmetics is not a “designated kind of release into the environment”. However, you need to consider if this definition is met for any other uses that your chemical has. If the introduction of your chemical involves a designated kind of release into the environment, the environment exposure band is 4.

Otherwise, the environment exposure band for your introduction could be 1, 2, 3 or 4, depending on the environment categorisation volume (ECV) for your chemical.

The ECV for your introduction will be the same as the total volume of your chemical that you will introduce in a registration year, unless you choose to work out a lower ECV due to your chemical having:

  • an end use in products meeting our definition of “Personal care products - limited environmental release” (for example, nail polish)
  • other end uses in addition to cosmetics

The environment exposure band for your introduction is:

  • 1 if the ECV for your introduction is ≤25 kg
  • 2 if the ECV is >25 kg and ≤1,000 kg
  • 3 if the ECV is >1,000 kg and ≤10,000 kg
  • 4 if the ECV is >10,000 kg.

Information you need to show that your chemical does not have environment hazard characteristics

Read Step 5.4 of the Categorisation Guide

Read Use of animal test data for chemicals in cosmetics

We do not require you to have data to demonstrate the absence of hazard characteristics for many introductions (for example, PLCs and those that fall into lower environment exposure bands).

The circumstances where we do require information to demonstrate the absence of hazard characteristics to categorise your introduction are outlined in the Categorisation Guidelines. For each hazard characteristic we provide details of all acceptable alternatives that you can use instead of animal test data.

Reporting and record keeping obligations

Make sure you can meet your reporting and record keeping obligations for your introductions. For requirements that apply to all chemical introductions see our guidance on reporting and record keeping obligations.

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