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Renew your registration for 2020-21 – the cost depends on the value of industrial chemicals imported or manufactured in the previous financial year.

Basics of importing and manufacturing chemicals

If you’re importing or manufacturing (introducing) chemicals into Australia, you’ll most likely need to register with AICIS. Follow these steps to get started.

Icon of 4 steps

Step 1: Work out if you need to register

If you’re importing or manufacturing (introducing) chemicals into Australia, you’ll most likely need to register your business with us (AICIS). However, there are some circumstances where you may not need to register – such as importing products for personal or hobby use. If you’re unsure, read 'Introductions that don't require categorisation and registration' and you can also use our decision tool – do I need to register with AICIS?

See also:

Step 2: Register your business

We consider importing an industrial chemical into Australia or manufacturing an industrial chemical locally as ‘introducing’ a chemical. Unless you don't need to register with us, you must register your business with us and pay a fee if you introduce industrial chemicals — or products that release industrial chemicals. You don’t register your products or chemicals with us.

You register your business with us, not your products.

You must register your business in any given registration year before you import or manufacture an industrial chemical. Our registration year is 1 September - 31 August.

We publish a list of registered businesses on our website.

Your registration fees and charges are based on your previous registration year’s total importation or manufacture (introduction) value.

For example; if your introduction value is less than $50,000, there is a charge of $0 and you only need to pay an annual fee of $72.

See also:

Step 3: Categorise your introduction and keep records

Each chemical that you want to introduce has to be authorised under 1 of our 5 introduction categories:

  1. Listed introduction
  2. Exempted introduction
  3. Reported introduction
  4. Assessed introduction
  5. Commercial evaluations

The Health Minister can also authorise chemical introductions under exceptional circumstances.

Diagram of the 5 AICIS introduction categories

To work out your introduction category, start by searching our Inventory. Enter the CAS number or CAS name for every industrial chemical you want to introduce into our Inventory search bar. You can also search by keyword.

1. Listed introductions

If your chemical appears in the search results, it means it is categorised as a ‘listed introduction’ and is already available for industrial use in Australia. 

You must be registered and meet any specific regulatory obligations or restrictions for the chemical. Learn about regulatory obligations that you may see for chemicals on our Inventory. 

You'll also need to:

If you're sure that the chemical introduction is not listed on the Inventory, you'll need to work out whether it’s authorised under any of our other introduction categories.

2. Exempted introductions

An introduction is categorised as an ‘exempted introduction’ means we consider it to be very low risk to human health and the environment. You can introduce the chemical without telling us beforehand, as long as you’re registered with us.

You'll also need to:

3. Reported introductions

An introduction is categorised as a ‘reported introduction’ means we consider it to be low risk to human health and the environment. You must submit a once-off pre-introduction report before you start introducing it.

You'll also need to:

If your introduction is categorised as a reported introduction and you are relying on an international assessment report, you can also apply for protection of information as confidential business information. 

4. Assessed introductions

An introduction is categorised as an ‘assessed introduction’ means we consider it to be medium to high risk to human health or the environment, or both. It cannot be exempted or reported. We must assess your introduction and issue an assessment certificate before you can import or manufacture it. The chemical will be listed on the Inventory after 5 years (or earlier if you successfully apply for an early listing). We can also assess a chemical that you have introduced as an exempted or reported introduction if you want your chemical to be listed on the Inventory.

We publish information about each chemical we assess, including an assessment or evaluation statement.

You'll also need to:

If your introduction is categorised as an assessed introduction, you must apply for an assessment certificate. You can also apply for protection of your confidential business information.

5. Commercial evaluation

Under this category, you can apply for a time-limited Commercial Evaluation Authorisation so you can test the chemical’s commercial viability in Australia.

You’ll also need to:

Note: the introduction category for your chemical may change if the circumstances of your introduction of that chemical change. For example, if the amount of the chemical that you introduce each year increases, or there are new uses for the chemical, you will need to check whether the category of introduction has changed. An introduction is only authorised if it is correctly categorised.

See also:

Step 4: Submit an annual declaration

Regardless of your introduction category, you must submit an annual declaration at the end of every registration year. This is a declaration you make about the industrial chemicals you imported or manufactured in the previous registration year and confirms that your introductions were authorised under our laws.

Example

Joe would like to import bottles of a multi-purpose cleaning product to sell commercially through his business JJ CLEANING.

Step 1: Work out if you need to register

Joe knows that the 10 ingredients in his multi-purpose cleaning product are regulated as industrial chemicals. But he's still not sure so he reads the 'What is registration and who must register' page. After reading this page, he is certain that he needs to register his business with us (AICIS). 

Step 2: Register your business

Joe determines the registration level that applies for his business, then logs on to AICIS Business Services and registers his business. He doesn’t need to register his products or chemicals.

Step 3: Categorise your introduction and keep records

Joe goes to our Inventory search page. He enters the CAS number or CAS name for each of the 10 chemical ingredients in his product into the Inventory search field. The search results show that all 10 ingredients are listed on our Inventory. Joe checks to see if there are specific regulatory obligations or restrictions for the chemicals — and makes sure he can meet these obligations. 

As all of the chemicals are listed on the Inventory — and Joe can meet any obligations for the chemicals — each of Joe’s introductions are therefore categorised as a ‘listed introduction’.

Joe doesn't need to send us any information about the product or the chemicals in it before importing. He checks his reporting and record-keeping obligations and makes sure he keeps the correct records to ensure his introduction is authorised under our ‘listed’ category.

Step 4: Submit an annual declaration
At the end of the registration year period (1 September to 31 August each year), Joe submits an annual declaration about all the chemicals that JJ CLEANING PTY LTD imported or manufactured during the past registration year.

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